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20121226
20130103
SHOW
STATION
LINKTV 11
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
. in his first national address since signing the constitution into law, morsi called for unity in the aftermath of egypt's divisive referendum. >> because of this result, in order to build the nation, we must all come to gather, which is why dialogue has become a necessity we cannot do without. we all seek within this framework a dialogue of national unity over issues we face in the future. >> president morsi spoke after egypt's upper house of parliament held its first session following the constitution's passage. egyptian opposition leaders have vowed to continue their protest against morsi, calling the constitution process unfair and too skewed toward islam is rules. at a news conference, a spokesperson called for a new demonstration january 25, the second anniversary of the egyptian revolution. >> the front reiterate its rejection of occurred formation of the upper house of parliament and the politics of distributing bribes and the spoils of battle and in sincere dialogue that has now been taking place for some time at the presidency, which is a dialogue through submission t
now!" >> the nays are 8. the bill as amended is passed. >> today's agreement, the law will remain in place as long as i'm president rid the deficit needs to be produced in a way that is balanced. everyone pays their fair share. everyone does their part. that is our economy works best. >> after much drama, the so- called fiscal cliff has been averted for now. we will look at what is in the senate approved by the house late last night. we will speak with economist juliet schor. after years of extreme weather, will 2013 be year zero in the battle over climate change? >> we're closer now them have ever been to what we need to do. i think we peeled away the layers of the onion and have gotten to the heart of things. as of tonight, we're going after the fossil fuel industries. [applause] >> will host a discussion between bill mckibben, founder of 350.org, and journalist christian parenti. he is author of "tropic of chaos: climate change and the new geography of violence." >> if the government allowed the epa to do what it must do, raise the price of burning fossil fuels, that would help
on the facts of any given case as well as the laws of the state of florida. >> in a national broadcast exclusive we are joined by and as a whistleblower william bennett. >> after 9/11, all of the raps came off for nsa, and between the white house, nsa, cia, decided to eliminate the protections of u.s. citizens and collect domestically. they started collecting from commercial -- the one commercial company that i know of that participated, provided over -- on average, 320 million records of communication of u.s. citizen to another citizen into the country. >> we are going to interrupt the broadcast because right now we have just gotten a call from someone in prison in pennsylvania. he is speaking to us for the first time, no lover on death row. >> you probably heard me referred to life as slow death row. it sounds a little dramatic, but it is really more truth to it than hyperbole. that is because of, in terms of lifers, it has the largest percentage in pennsylvania. there is no radiation. all lifers are lifers. as you see, as i have seen, a child going to a meal, what i call the million
governor rick snyder has signed into law a measure allowing michigan areas to declare bankruptcy or fall under the control of an unelected emergency manager enabled to fire public officials and nullify union contracts. state republicans approved it this month after voters repealed a similar initiative on election day. despite reimposing a measure that was rejected by popular vote, governor snyder said -- was among a number of controversial bills recently advanced by state republicans in michigan before their majority declines with a new legislative session next month. the chicago teachers union has filed a lawsuit accusing a city of discriminating against african-american teachers and staff through its effort to reform or shut down local schools. the federal suit says more than half of the tenured teachers who lost their jobs in the most recent wave of school closings were african-american, despite african-americans comprising just 30% of tenured teachers overall and 35% in the underperforming schools that wound up -- wind up being closed. the teachers' union is seeking an injunction to
of transafrica, a law professor at pennsylvania state university, most recent book "makada" said at the dawn of the civil rights era following a young man coming of age in segregated richmond, virginia. through his blind grandmother and her visions, he discovers her his race and africa. he came to our studios on the eve of dr. king's birthday to talk about his new novel. he lives now in st. kitts. >> when i was a child growing up in richmond, virginia, we were called negros. no one i knew we were called that. no one knew the province of that word. it had no connection to what we might have been before we were blocked from review by that lethal, opaque space of slavery. so we did not know anything about ourselves except we had been called this, but not by ourselves. it turns out is much like the case of the sardine. there is no such thing as a sardine as a fish living free in the ocean. it only becomes one when it is captured and put in a pan. and we were only called negros when we were leveled during slavery as that, as a way of severing us from any memory of what we had been. so we lost our
laws and policies and direct our committed these without any consent on our part. this is just more of these same. he does not address any of the core issues like a final crisis in many of our communities. the purposeful _ -- underfunding of food, education, water, housing. the very thing that contributes to our premature deaths. he is talking about more dialogue. look where it has brought us? in the last 20 years, every single socio-economic indicator for first nations has gone down hill. when you look at the mandate of indian affairs, they only have one job. of those 5000 bureaucrats to use up billions of our dollars have to improve the social well-being of first nations in this country, and they have built over and over again. dialogue is not going to do it. it is only one of the action. >> can you talk a little bit about how the idle no more protests tie into the national movement against tar sands, the tar sands pipeline? >> when you think about it, this movement has been in the works for several years. i know myself and many others have been working to and former first nations
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)